Mountain Lion or Cougar as seen by Seton

Mountain Lion or Cougar as seen by Seton

I have seen only two mountain lions. One huge animal was patiently standing beside a highway near Cimarron, New Mexico, waiting for traffic to pass so he could safely cross. The other I found when crawling through dense shrubbery at night, without a flashlight,...
Two Really Wild Cats Ocelot and Bobcat

Two Really Wild Cats Ocelot and Bobcat

Bobcat Bobcats are a curious lot. I know three people who within the last couple of years have had one of these beautiful felines come up to their houses and take a look into a window. Peeping toms? At the beginning of November, I saw one—very dark colored—cross the...
The Jaguar is a Pleasure to Look At

The Jaguar is a Pleasure to Look At

Seton quotes [John] Audubon & [John] Bachman from Quadrupeds of North America (1849-1851) regarding an encounter with a jaguar. One of the great creatures was following a Colonel Hays, apparently out of curiosity. Hays noted that the cat was looking “’right in his...
Tiger Portraits

Tiger Portraits

Ernest Thompson Seton never saw a tiger in the wild since he did not travel outside of Europe and North American. He clearly admired them as subjects, creating several bold portraits. (All image rights reserved by the Academy for the Love of Learning)
Lion Portraits

Lion Portraits

Seton’s drawings of big cats can come across not as generic “lion” or “tiger” but as actual portraits of individuals. Some of these were done at the London Zoo during his first trip abroad. One of Seton’s animal subjects, “Landseer’s Lion” was named for the English...
Cats of the Smallest Kind

Cats of the Smallest Kind

Included in the Academy’s collection of Seton art are depictions of cats, from lions to the household variety. Seton began his major work of natural history, Lives of Game Animals (1925) with cats. He was particularly struck by the physical similarity of cats within a...

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